Kong's Red Junglefowls

Specializing in Southeast Asian Red Junglefowls

Our Foundation Roosters

Our Southeast Asian red junglefowls are composed of imported junglefowls from the countries of Laos and Thailand, guaranteed.  We do comprehensive research into the validity of each strain prior to their acquisition.  Acquired birds are evaluated using four equally important criteria: 1) purity (genetics), morphological characteristics (physical), behavior (skittishness, hyperactiveness, flight capability), and crow quality (auditory).  Only birds that meet the highest degree of qualifications in all four areas are kept and used in our strict breeding program.  Without further adieu, let me introduce you to our roosters.

 

Southeast Asian Red Junglefowls (Gallus gallus spadiceus)

Both of our Southeast Asian Red Junglefowl foundation males below are from exclusive imported bloodlines only found here at Kong's Red Junglefowls.  Both males possess high purity, excellent morphological characteristics, behavioral characteristics, and extraordinary crows.  Strengths of these birds include: teardrop shaped heads, thin combs, dark slate colored legs, long legs, brilliant coloration, horizontal tail carriage, only 5 lesser sickles, appropriate main sickle length, 4-syllable crow, third syllable glottal roll, short ending crows, flight capability of a quail, and eclipse molts.

Both males' flaws would be having a 5th sickle feather and having slight bends on their combs.  Pure red junglefowl males have 4 sickle feathers and have upright combs for the majority of the breeding season.  This fact indicates that our two males have marginal hybridization.  Nonetheless, these two males still represent the essence of a true Southeast Asian Red Junglefowl.

Note- Our 2 Southeast Asian Red Junglefowl Breeder Males are extremely high-crossed specimen and are near-pure red junglefowl birds. They contain 50-60% pure red junglefowl bloodlines and are of direct imported birds.  They are unrelated to any junglefowls in the United States, guaranteed.


Kong Vang Southeast Asian Red Junglefowl Strain

 

  December 2010

 


 Full Adult Plumage - 6/29/2011 

This is one of our Foundation Red Junglefowl Males.  He is unique and exclusive only to our aviary.  He is composed of 100% Southeast Asian red junglefowl bloodlines and is a near pure (extremely high-crossed) specimen at approximately 50-60% pure. He possesses exceptional morphological characteristics to a  true red junglefowl, exhibits skittish hyperactive behaviors, flies like a quail, and has an exceptional crow. 

He truly represents each aspect of a genuine Southeast Asian Red Junglefowl.

Strengths in comparison to a Wild Red Junglefowl:

1) Excellent vibrant red coloration

2) Small tear-drop shaped head

3) Thin comb

4) Horizontal tail-carriage

5) Appropriate length in his main sickle tail feathers

6) Only 5 lesser sickle tail feathers

7) Short lesser sickle tail feathers

8) Proportionate leg length

9) Extreme dark slate-colored legs

10) Extreme flight capability (similar to a quail)

11) Very skittish and hyperactive behavior

12) Experiences an annual eclipse molt with short pure black feathers replacing its long bright red neck hackles

 

Weaknesses in comparison to a Wild Red Junglefowl:

1)  Five lesser sickle feathers (if you recall in my "Ideal Red Junglefowls page", pure red jungelfowls must possess only 4 lesser sickles)

2) Slight lean to his comb (the rigidity of it varies depending on the day, mood of the bird, and season of the year).

Besides the two flaws, this bird is an extraordinary specimen.  We are truly blessed to have raised  and currently own such a fine bird.  Below are some videos of our Foundation Male #1.

 

This is a video recorded in January of 2012.  He is in full breeding plumage and is 1.75-years-old.

 

This video was recorded when he was near full eclipse in September of 2011.  This male goes through an eclipse molt in which his long red neck hackle feathers are replaced by short, round-tipped, part black and part orange feathers through the months of August through October.  At this time of the year, the male loses his hormones,  is infertile, and is significantly less aggressive.

Kong Vang Southeast Asian Red Junglefowl Strain

December 2010

 




 
Start of Eclipse Molt - June 27, 2011
 
 

 
Eclipse Molt in Progress - July 16, 2011
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Almost in Full Eclipse, male has completely stopped crowing
- August 3, 2011 (will update in a month)
 

This is our second Foundation Red Junglefowl Male.  He is a half-brother to the above male as they share the same father.  This male is composed of 100% Southeast Asian red junglefowl bloodlines and is a near pure (extremely high-crossed) specimen at approximately 50-60% pure.  He possesses exceptional morphological characteristics to a  true red junglefowl, exhibits skittish hyperactive behaviors, flies like a quail, and has an exceptional crow. 

Strengths in comparison to a Wild Red Junglefowl:

1) Excellent vibrant red coloration

2) Small tear-drop shaped head

3) Thin comb

4) Horizontal tail-carriage

5) Appropriate length in his main sickle tail feathers

6) Only 5 lesser sickle tail feathers

7) Short lesser sickle tail feathers

8) Long legs

9) Extreme dark slate-colored legs

10) Extreme flight capability (similar to a quail)

11) Very skittish and hyperactive behavior

12) Experiences an annual eclipse molt with short pure black feathers replacing its long bright red neck hackles

 

Weaknesses in comparison to a Wild Red Junglefowl:

1)  Five lesser sickle feathers (if you recall in my "Ideal Red Junglefowls page", pure red jungelfowls must possess only 4 lesser sickles)

2) Slight lean to his comb (although the rigidity of it varies depending on the day, mood of the bird, and season of the year)

 

This is a video of the male in January of 2012.  He is in full breeding plumage and is 1.75-years-old.

 

This video was recorded when he was near full eclipse in September of 2011.  Consistent with pure red junglefowls, this male goes through an eclipse molt in which his long red neck hackle feathers are replaced by short, round-tipped, pure black feathers through the months of August through October.  At this time of the year, the male loses his hormones,  is infertile, and is significantly less aggressive.